Study of Population Dynamics of Syrphid Fly (Order- Diptera, Family- Syrphidae) in ITM University Gwalior, India

Tufail Ahmad *

Center of Agriculture Education, Faculty of Agriculture Science, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India.

Mohd Amir

Center of Agriculture Education, Faculty of Agriculture Science, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India.

Zainab Fatima

Center of Agriculture Education, Faculty of Agriculture Science, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India.

Rabiya Basri

School of Agriculture K R Mangalam University Gurugram, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

An intriguing ecological interaction can exist between aphids and Syrphid flies, particularly in the setting of millet crops. Aphids (Order Hemiptera: Family Aphididae) are a problem variety of crops, including all types of millets. Syrphid flies (Order Diptera: Family Syrphidae) naturally prey on aphids when they are in their larval stage. Syrphid fly larvae are referred to as "aphid lions" or "hoverfly larvae." Aphids are the main source of food for these larvae, and they manage the aphid population in millet crops. Therefore, Syrphids are used as natural enemies and biological control agents and syrphid flies are advantageous insects in agriculture. The present study was conducted in the month of August 2021 to March 2022 (summer and winter season) to find out the population dynamic of syrphid flies in agricultural farms and the campus of ITM University. The target crops like maize, sorghum, pearl millets, okra, mustard crop, cabbage cauliflower, marigold and brinjal were tagged and marked and Syrphid fly larvae and pupa were counted four times in a month. The larvae and pupa were also collected and kept for adult emergence. The maximum number of larvae were collected from the Turari campus and were as a minimum found in CRC 2. The other predator like lady bird beetles were also observed but their population was very minor. The population of syrphid flies and larvae depends on the climatic conditions and the availability of foods and their prey.

Keywords: Syrphid fly, biodiversity Pearson’s correlation, population dynamics


How to Cite

Ahmad, Tufail, Mohd Amir, Zainab Fatima, and Rabiya Basri. 2024. “Study of Population Dynamics of Syrphid Fly (Order- Diptera, Family- Syrphidae) in ITM University Gwalior, India”. Asian Research Journal of Agriculture 17 (3):10-16. https://doi.org/10.9734/arja/2024/v17i3467.

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