The Impact of Varying Levels of Tectona grandis Leafmeal on the Performance of Broiler Chickens

Daramola O.T *

Department of Agricultural Technology, The Federal Polytechnic, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria.

Arire E.O

Department of Agricultural Technology, The Federal Polytechnic, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria.

Acheneje P.

Department of Agricultural Technology, The Federal Polytechnic, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

This study assessed the impact of varying levels of Tectona grandis leafmeal (TGLM) dietary supplementation on the performance of broiler chickens. A basal diet divided into four portions designated diet 1 (the control) and diets 2, 3 and 4 supplemented with 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6%, respectively. One hundred and forty four broiler chicks were randomly assigned to the four experimental diets (36 birds per diet; 9 birds per replicate) using a Completely Randomized Design. At the finisher phase the body weight gain and feed conversion ratio of the birds fed 0.2 and 0.6% TGLM supplemented diets was better (P<0.05) than those fed control diet and 0.4% TGLM supplemented diets. Serum cholesterol concentration was significantly (P<0.05) lower in the birds fed 0.4 and 0.6% TGLM supplemented diets compared to control diet. The catalase concentration in the birds fed 0.4 and 0.6% TGLM supplemented diets were (P<0.05) higher than those birds fed control diet and 0.2% TGLM supplemented diets while the glutathione peroxidase concentration in the birds fed 0.4% TGLM supplemented diets was higher (P<0.05) than those fed control diet, 0.2 and 0.6% TGLM supplemented diet. The lipid peroxidation in the birds fed 0.6% TGLM supplemented diets was (P<0.05) significantly lower compared to the control diet, 0.2% and 0.4% TGLM supplemented diets. The live-weight of the birds fed 0.4 and 0.6% TGLM supplemented diet was higher (P<0.05) than those fed control diet and 0.2% TGLM supplemented diets. The colour score of birds fed 0.4% TGLM supplemented diets was higher (P<0.05) than those fed other diets. The overall acceptability score thigh meat of birds fed 0.4% TGLM supplemented diet was significantly (P<0.05) higher compared to other experimental diets. It was concluded that TGLM supplementation in this study has phytochemicals of health benefits and possess antioxidant properties.

Keywords: Tectona grandis, broilers, antioxidant, serum metabolites, carcass


How to Cite

Daramola O.T, Arire E.O, & Acheneje P. (2024). The Impact of Varying Levels of Tectona grandis Leafmeal on the Performance of Broiler Chickens. Asian Research Journal of Agriculture, 17(2), 294–302. https://doi.org/10.9734/arja/2024/v17i2450

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Valenzuela-Grijalva NV, Pinelli- Saavedra A, Muhlia-Almazan A, Dominguez-Diaz D, Gonzalez-Rios H. Dietary inclusion effects of phytochemicals as growth promoters in animal production. Journal of Animal Science and Technology. 2017;59:8 DOI:http://doi.org/10.1186/s40781-071-0133-9.

Gonzalez RM, Angeles, HJC. Antibiotic and synthetic growth promoters in animal diets: Review of impact and analytical methods. Food Control. 2017;72:255-267.

Oloruntola, OD, Agbede JO, Ayodele SO and Oloruntola DA. Neem, pawpaw and bamboo leaf meal dietary supplementation in broiler chickens: Effect on performance and health status. Journal of Food Biochemistry. 2018;12723 Available:https://doi.org/10.1111/jfbc.12723.

OJEU. Regulation (EC) No.1831/2003 of European parliament and the council of 22 September 2003 on additives for use in animal nutrition. Official Journal of the European Union. in OJEU. Brussels: OJEU. 2003;L268/36.

Gonzalel-Rios H, Davila-Ramirez JL, Pena-Ramos EA, Valenzuela- Melendres M, Zamorano-Garcia L, Islava-Lagarda TY, Valenzuela-Grijalva NV. Dietary supplementation of ferulic acid to steers under commercial feedlot feeding conditions improves meat quality and shell life. Animal Feed Science and Technology. 2016;222:111-121.

Mahesh S, Vaishnav V, Kumar P, Mohammed N, Ansari SA. Characterization and validation of teak plus trees ramets of national teak germ plasm bank, Chandrapur, Maharashtra through microsatellites. Tropical Plant Research 2016;3(1):213-220.

Tapsell LC, Hemphill I, Coblac L. Health benefits of herbs and spices. The past, the present and future. Medical Journal of Australia. 2006;185(4 suppl.):24-54.

Shruthi DP, Sunith, KE, Harith, Kumari E, Govindappa M, Siddalindeshwara, KG. Phytochemical screening, antioxidant and anti inflammatory activity of different extracts from leaf, stem and bark of Tectona grandis. International Journal of Research in Pharmacology and pharmacotherapeutics. 2012;1(2):140-146.

Gladine C, Morand C, Rock E, Bauchart D, Durand D. Plant extracts rich in polyphenols (PERP) are efficient antioxidants to revent lipoperoxidation in plasma lipids from animals fed n-3 PUFA supplemented diets. Journal of Animal Feed Science and Technology. 2007;136: 3-4, 281-296

Windisch W, Schedle K, Plitzner C, Kroismayr A. Use of phytogenic products as feed additives for swine and poultry. Journal of Animal Science. 2008;86:140-147.

NRC. Nutrient requirements of poultry (9th Revised Ed.). Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 1994.

Aebi H. Catalase estimation. In: Bergmeyer HV (ed.). Methods of enzymatic analysis. Verlag Chemical, New York Academic Press, New York; 1974.

Misra HP, Fridovich I. The univalent reduction of oxygen by flavins and quinines. Journal of Biological Chemistry. 1972;247(1):188-192.

Rotruck JT, Pope AL, Ganther HE, Hafeman DG, Hoekstra WG. Selenium: Biochemical role as a component of glutathione peroxidase. Science. 1973; 179:588-590. Available:https://doi.org/10.1126/ science.179.4073.588.

Allinson IB, Ekunseitan DA, Ayoola AA, Ogunade IM, Njoku CP. Effect of herbal supplement on growth response and faecal egg counts of cockerel. Online Journal Animal Feed Research. 2013;3:68-73.

Tekeli A, Celik L, Kutlu HR, Gorgulu M. Effect of dietary supplemental plant on performance, carcass characteristics, digestive system development, intestinal microflora and some blood parameters of broiler chicks. Proceedings of 12th European Poultry Conference, September 10-14, Verona, Italy. 2006;307-308.

Lee KW, Everts H, Beynen AC. Essentials oils in broiler nutrition. International Journal Poultry Science. 2004;3:738-752

Peter ML, Susan CEF. Interpretation of Laboratory results. Australian Veterinarian practitioner.1999;21(4);188-193.

Oloruntola OD, Agbede JO, Ayodele SO, Oloruntola DA. Neem, pawpaw and bamboo leafmeal dietary supplementation in broiler chickens: Effect on performance and health status. Journal of Food Biochemistry. 2018:e12723. Available:https://doi.org/10.1111/jfbc.12723.

Olkowski AA, Wojnarowicz C, Nain S., Ling B, Alcorn JM, Laarveld, B. A study on pathogenesis of sudden death syndrome in broiler chickens. Research in Veterinary Science. 2007;85:131-140.

Young IS, Woodside JV. Antioxidants in health and disease. Journal of Clinical Pathology. 2001;54(Suppl 3):176-186.

Goyal AK, Brahma BK. Antioxidant and nutraceutical potential of bamboo: An overview. International Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences. 2006;3:2-10.

Dhama K, Latheef SK, Mani S, Samad HA, Karthik K, Tiwari R, Khan RU, Alagawany M, Faraq MR, Alam GM, Laudadio V, Tufarrelli V. Multiple beneficial applications and modes of acion of herbs in poultry health and production- A review. International Journal of Pharmacology. 2015;11:152-176.

Kanduri AB, Munde VK, Khan MA, Thakur PN, Saxena MJ, Ravikanth K, Thakur A, Maini S. Study on the comparative efficacy of natural growth promoter (AV/AGP/10) with antibiotic supplements on overall growth performance and intestinal micrometry of broiler birds. British Microbiology Research Journal. 2013;3: 623-634.

Apata ES. Quality attributes of Red-Sokoto buck meat as influenced by post-slaughter processing methods. Ph..D. Thesis in the Department of Animal Science, University of Ibadan, Ibadan Oyo-State, Nigeria; 2011.