Assessment of Constraints to Participation of Rural Women in Technology Dissemination of Women in Agriculture Program in Imo State, Nigeria

Main Article Content

M. N. Okeke
E. N. Mbah
I. I. Nwoye

Abstract

The survey was conducted to identify constraints to participation of rural women in technology dissemination of Women in Agriculture Program (WIA) in Imo State, Nigeria. Questionnaire was used to collect data from a sample of 60 respondents. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics such as frequency, percentage and mean score. Results showed that 33.0% of the respondents were aged between 41 and 50 years, majority (75.0%) were married, 88.0% had formal education and 55.3% engaged in farming and trading, while 56.6% had a household size of 6-10 persons. The respondents participated in the activities like processing and utilization of food crops (16.7%), harvesting and storage of food crops (16.7%), dry season vegetable production (13.3%), processing and utilization of livestock products (10.0%), processing and utilization of soya bean into soya milk and soya meal (6.7%). The study recommended that rural women should be encouraged to join co-operative societies in order to pull their resources together. It also highlighted the need for promotion of rural women’s activities through adequate provision of credit facilities by government at all levels for optimum productivity.

Keywords:
Technology dissemination, women participation, rural women

Article Details

How to Cite
Okeke, M. N., Mbah, E. N., & Nwoye, I. I. (2019). Assessment of Constraints to Participation of Rural Women in Technology Dissemination of Women in Agriculture Program in Imo State, Nigeria. Asian Research Journal of Agriculture, 11(3), 1-7. https://doi.org/10.9734/arja/2019/v11i330057
Section
Original Research Article

References

Imonikebe BU. Constraints to rural women farmers’ involvement in food production in Nigeria. African Research Review. 2010; 4(3):281-288.

Bayeh E. The role of empowering women and achieving gender equality to the sustainable development of Ethiopia. Pacific Science Review B: Humanities and Social Sciences. 2016;2(1):37-42.

Singh S. Contract farming in India: Impacts on women and child workers. International Institute for Environment and Development, Gatekeeper Series, No. 111, London; 2003.

Teeken B, Olaosebikan O, Haleegoah J, Oladejo E, Madu T, Bello A, Tufan HA. Cassava trait preferences of men and women farmers in Nigeria: implications for breeding. Economic Botany. 2018;72(3), 263-277.

Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). The role of women in agriculture. Agricultural Development Economics Division ESA Working Paper No. 2011;11-02;1-48.

Jaka H, Shava E. Resilient rural women’s livelihoods for poverty alleviation and economic empowerment in semi-arid regions of Zimbabwe. Jàmbá: Journal of Disaster Risk Studies. 2018;10(1).

Auta SJ. Performance of women groups in agricultural activities in kaduna State. Unpublished Ph. D Thesis, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria; 2004.

Obiora CJ. Need assessment: Overview from women farmers in Anambra State, Nigeria. Greener Journal of Agricultural Sciences. 2013;3(8):618-622.

Singh S. Contract farming in India: Impacts on women and child workers. International Institute for Environment and Development, Gatekeeper Series, No. 111, London; 2003.

Agarwal M. Economic participation of rural women in agriculture. Empowerment of Rural Women in India; 2003.

Mgbada JU. Production of staple crops by rural women in Enugu States, lessons for enhancing poverty alleviation programmes. In: Idowu TA (Eds.), Agricultural extension and poverty alleviation in Nigeria, Proceedings of the Agricultural Extension Society of Nigeria; 2002.

Tologbonse EB, Jibrin MM, Auta SJ, Damaisa MA. Factors influencing women participation in Women in Agriculture (WIA) Programe of Kaduna State Agricultural Development Programme. International Journal of Agricultural Economics and Extension. 2013;1(7):47-54.

Umeh OJ, Nwachukwu I. Revamping grassroots agricultural production through the Agricultural Extension Transformation Agenda. 2015;2-7.

African Rice Centre. Commodity watch: NERICA contributes to record rice harvest in Africa. New Agricultural Digest Abuja. 2007;16-18.

Agbamu JU. Essentials of Agricultural Communication in Nigeria. Malthouse Press Limited, Lagos. 2006;65- 73.

Aniedu C, Aniedu OC. Gender mainstreaming in agricultural development in Nigeria. In: Agricultural extension and rural development. Nwachukwu (ed.) Lamb House Publisher, Umuahia; 2013.

National Population Commission (NPC). National population census projected figure for Delta state. National Population Commission Publication, Abuja, Nigeria; 2006.

Aniedu C, Aniedu OC. Gender mainstreaming in agricultural development in Nigeria. In: Agricultural extension and rural development. Nwachukwu (ed.) Lamb House Publisher, Umuahia; 2013.

Ladele AA. Dynamics of agricultural extension service structure and policy: the need for group extension in sustainable agricultural technology transfer in Nigeria. In: SQ Afolayan and IA Akinbode. (Eds.), Proceedings of the Inaugural Conference of the Agricultural Extension Society of Nigeria; 1994.

Nwaoha C. Evaluation of women in agriculture programme of Imo State agricultural development programme. Case study of Owerri Agricultural Zone of Imo State. Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Abia State, Nigeria; 2008.

Nwogu CN. Assessing the impacts of Women in agriculture component of ADP on female farmers in Umuahia agricultural zone of Abia state, Nigeria. Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Umuahia, Abia State, Nigeria; 2008.